Monday, October 20, 2014

Moving Towards Self-Reliance, Part I: High Efficiency Lighting

I've been slowly working towards my goal of being self-reliant in food, water, energy and finances.  Today, I want to discuss how to become more energy-efficient as part of the larger goal of becoming self-reliant.  More specifically, I want to talk about high efficiency lighting.

Do Light Bulbs Really Use That Much Energy?

Yes.

According to the American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy, artificial lighting accounts for at least 10% of the typical American's total energy usage in their homes.  Various other sources claim even larger figures, with some experts citing that lighting can make up as high 30% of the annual electricity usage.

It's hard to imagine that a simple light bulb would use that much of total energy a house expends throughout the year.  Indeed, even the most inefficient light bulbs don't use that much power compared to other appliances, like refrigerators or clothes dryers.

Hardly anyone uses just one light bulb in most rooms in a typical house, however.  The combined sum of wattage used by light bulbs can quickly surpass that of larger, power-hungry appliances, especially when left on for long periods of time.

Obviously, turning off lights when not in use will save energy and money.  However, most of us like having artificial lighting, especially at night when we would accomplish nothing without said lighting.

Artificial lighting may be necessary, but we can choose specific types of light bulbs to significantly reduce our energy usage.

Monday, September 1, 2014

Garden Progress, Early September 2014 - Helpful Tips and Tricks from the Dow Dominion Garden

It took me longer than expected to post an update of my frugal veggie garden since my last article, but fear not!  Today, I've posted a new video going over some of the routine tasks I do in the garden, as well as some other tips and tricks I've picked up along the way this season.  I also do a tour around my garden (what's left of it, anyway) to show my readers what I am growing right now and what plants are still producing from the last sowing.  Here's a few highlights of the video:

  • What material I compost 
  • How often to turn the compost pile
  • How many tomato plants I expect to need to feed my family during the next growing season
  • Lots of mulching advice and recommendations
  • Fall gardening experiments
  • Beans, beans and more beans!
  • A primer on winter sowing
  • And more...



I hope you guys enjoy the video.  Let me know if there are any specific questions you would like answered, or any particular topics you would like to have me cover.  Stay tuned for further videos and articles!

Friday, August 15, 2014

Learning From 2014's Successes and Failures So Far

The weather has been strange lately.  Very strange.  The last week of July produced temperatures cold enough to need a comforter on my bed during the nights.  We normally expect to turn the AC on around this time of year, but it felt more like a nice, cool week in the fall, not smack-dab in the middle of summer.  So we decided to open the windows instead, to save money on electricity and to get some fresh air in the house.  It seemed very unusual, but we were welcoming of lower temperatures none-the-less.

My garden has gone through a number of changes over the past few weeks.  Most of my cool season vegetables have produced what they could and died off.  A majority of the summer crops are now producing ripe, delicious food.  Beautiful flowers that attract pollinators and predators have started to bloom, and I've started to sow more veggie seeds for the fall.  It's been a pretty bountiful gardening season, but despite that, I'm already starting to plan and design how next year's garden will be set up.

Today's post is going to be a review of what worked (and what didn't work) in my garden this season.  It's important for me to keep a record of these things, because I can further improve upon my successes, and either fix or avoid the failures that I had this year.  I think I have mentioned before that I would like to eventually have 80-90% of my family's food grown from our garden, and accurate record-keeping is necessary to move towards that goal.

So let's take a look at my successes and failures over the spring and summer this year, and how that will influence my garden's design for the next season.

Saturday, July 5, 2014

Garden Progress, Late June/Early July 2014 - Applying Permaculture Principles to the Garden, As Well As Other Experiments

It's been a good while since the start of summer, and my garden looks considerably different now than how it did in my last video.  In this month's update, I take a walk through the garden and explain what has changed over the course of the month.  I also talk about different projects I've been working on around the garden, in my pursuit of self-sufficiency.  Take a look:



I tried to fit as much updated information as I could into the video, but I know I missed a few things.  I promise to give these plants and/or ideas some time in the next video.  Additionally, I wanted to go into further detail about the different methodologies that I have been applying, so here are some notes on those techniques that I've taken from my own experience.

Monday, June 16, 2014

3 Tips to Keep Your Frugal Veggie Garden Healthy and Productive

It's the middle of June and it's getting hot outside!  My frugal veggie garden is growing fast, and I've already harvested quite a bit of my spring veggies.  Although I've not been weighing out my harvests like I intended to do (perhaps next year), my wife and I harvest and eat something from our garden nearly every day.


The peas vines are making good use of my cotton twine "trellis" (i.e. fence)

Snow peas and Sugar Snap peas both ready to eat

My frugal veggie-growing guide includes instructions and details on how to get your garden up and running for minimal money investment, but even a frugal veggie garden needs continual attention and maintenance to keep the plants productive.  Until now, I haven't really discussed the tasks that I am continually doing around the garden now that it is well established.  So today, I am going to share a few tips that I've learned over my few of gardening experience that make the biggest difference in terms of a healthy, happy vegetable garden.

Saturday, May 31, 2014

Garden Progress, Late May 2014 - Video Update!

I've been really busy with life in general, and I haven't been able to devote a lot of attention to writing for my blog.  I still wanted to give all my readers an update on how my garden has been doing, though, so I decided to make this post a video update!  I will walk you through various parts of my garden and show you how all of my plants are doing, as well as what I have been harvesting.  Enjoy!


Thursday, May 1, 2014

Garden Progress, Late April 2014 -- The Good, The Bad, The Ugly

It's the last day of April [Edit: Well, it was when I started writing this :P ], and my garden has already had a good share of ups and downs.  Slugs have taken a toll on quite a few of my plants.  Even daily slug slaughter-fests and beer traps, they manage to nibble some of my veggies out of existence.  Despite the slugs, most of my garden is doing very well and progressing as it should for this time of the year.  Let's have a look at what's growing.

Slugs: Always a problem

The Good

The spinach I planted is all doing great.  I've eaten a few baby leaves in some scrambled eggs already, but it has just now reached the point where I can harvest a good amount of leaves on a daily basis without hurting each plant.  I expect to be eating a lot of spinach salad very soon.  The slugs attack my spinach plants as well, but they must not like them nearly as much as my brassica family of plants.

Beets are also doing quite well.  They don't grow quite as fast as spinach, but nothing seems to bother them at all.  I've seen a few nibbles on the edges of the leaves but most of the square foot sections of beets are growing just fine.  Although I tolerate beets grated raw onto salads and cooked in soups, my wife absolutely loves them--for the taste and the colorful leaf display they add to the garden.  I'm happy to grow them since she is such a fan.